Fashion

Why Fashion Designers Want TikTok Users to Steal Their Designs

Surely there is a German word that exists to describe the singular anguish of spotting a piece of clothing one knows immediately they will never be able to afford. Sehnstylesucht, maybe. Liv Huffman was left with such a feeling after seeing Harry Styles perform on a February episode of The Today Show wearing a colorful JW Anderson cardigan. But her love for the piece, along with designer Jonathan Anderson’s work, was irreconcilable with its $1,600 price tag. So she came to a novel conclusion: making the piece on her own. She posted a video of her crocheting journey to TikTok, where the video helped kick-start a trend and has been liked over 975,000 times.

On TikTok, though, nothing is simply viewed and noted. By nature, the platform calls for copycats. Trends happen when users replicate dances created by other users, creators use the same lines of dialogue ripped from movies,

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Fashion Influencers Are Driving an Interiors Boom. How Are Home Brands Responding?

“A lot of people in fashion don’t understand that you can’t easily gift a rug or table. It doesn’t work the same as it does for a dress or a pair of shoes.”

Home is where the #content is — or so wrote Hilary George-Parkin in a 2017 Fashionista story titled, “Why Fashion Bloggers Are Evolving Into Home Decor Influencers.”

Three years later, may I ask: Why were once-strictly-fashion-adjacent influencers venturing into more home-furnished pastures?

George-Parkin’s reporting is certainly worth revisiting in its own right, but for the interest of this piece, I’ll say the gist was this: With the influencer class having, well, influenced our clothing and accessories to a certain degree of satisfaction, our homes became their next logical frontier with which to express their particular stamps of style.

With the help of an affiliate link or 15, these professional tastemakers have come to establish themselves as bona

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Without End-of-Year School Fashion Shows, How Are Design Graduates Showcasing Their Work?

Finishing thesis collections and showcasing them from quarantine has created both challenges and opportunities for fashion school grads.

Michelle Hill, a B.F.A. Accessory Design graduate at SCAD, presents her final collection digitally.
Michelle Hill, a B.F.A. Accessory Design graduate at SCAD, presents her final collection digitally.

While marquee-name designers are still trying figure out if and how they’ll approach Spring 2021 fashion shows come September, a different group of designers has already been forced to navigate this challenge, and without much time to prepare.

Typically, May is when prominent design schools hold runway events — sometimes doubling as fundraisers — where at least a selection of graduating students get to showcase their work. They might also get their garments judged in-person by faculty and/or a jury of industry professionals. Potential employers can be among the audience members. 

For many graduating students, these runway shows represent everything they’ve been working toward throughout their undergraduate and graduate careers. They enter fashion school as freshmen or first-year

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